Crying: Baby Has Colic

Colic is defined as inconsolable crying that occurs or several hours each day, usually on the evening. Colic usually declares itself by two to four weeks, and symptoms usually disappear by four months. It is still poorly understood, but here are some tips for comforting your colicky baby.

  • Lay your baby across your knees and gently pat her back.

 

  • Lay your baby on her back and press her legs into a deep knee bend to help expel wind.

 

 

  • Massage your baby’s abdomen in a circular pattern.

 

 

  • Walk around holding your baby and patting his back.

 

 

  • Hold your baby in different positions until you find one that is comfortable for her, such as across your arm or facing out while you hold her stomach.

 

 

  • Take your baby for a drive in the car.

 

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Crying: Baby is distressed

Babies also cry when they are scared, lonely, or bored. After you check for physical problems, try the following tips to calm a distressed baby.

  • Cuddle up

. Hold your baby, talk to him, and keep him close so he feels safe and secure.
Take a walk. Put your baby in a front pack and take a walk to distract him from his distress.
Swing. Put your baby in a baby swing for a few minutes to see if the motion helps calm him down.
Rock. Soothe your baby by nursing him in the rocking chair.
Take a dip. Tri giving your baby a warm bath for a change of sensation and environment.
Play. Entertain your baby with funny faces or a special toy.

 

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Crying: Baby Is Tired

Babies sometime need help getting to sleep. here some tips to help her getting to sleep;

Swing. Put your baby in the baby swing, and she will probably swing herself to sleep.

Walk. Take your baby for a walk I the front pack or stroller to see I the motion puts her to sleep.

Rock. Hold your baby in your arms and sway her, or rock in the rocking chair until she conks out.

Take a drive. Put your baby in the car seat and take her or a drive. When she falls sleep, bring her inside. Never leave her unattended in the car.

 

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Crying: Baby Is in Pain

When a baby is in pain the cry is usually sharp and loud. Check for the following causes and talk to your doctor, if necessary.

Nappy rash. Check to see if the nappy area is red and pimply, then apply some nappy rash cream.

Teething. If your baby is drooling, irritable, and putting her fingers or other objects in her mouth, she may be teething.

Earache. If your baby is rubbing her ear, she may have an ear infection. Check her temperature and call the doctor, if necessary.

Stomachache. If your baby is constipated, irritable, has wind, vomits, or arches her back after a feeding, talk to your doctor about possible interventions.

Nappy pin. Your baby may have a nappy pin pressing against her flesh, so check out her nappy area and fix the pin

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Aim and Shoot: Breastfeeding Positioning

Breastfeeding provides the prefect opportunity for Mom to take a break from her busy day.

Get comfortable. Choose a chair that provides support and helps you relax. Pad it with extra pillows for added comfort.

Change positions. Try a number of breastfeeding positions if you are not comfortable with your original position. A U-shaped pillow wrapped around your waist may help support your baby and get him in the right position.

Check your baby’s airway. Make sure your baby’s breathing is not impeded by your breast or pillows or anything else.

Change breasts. Change sides in the middle of each feeding, and begin each feeding with the breast opposite the one you started with the previous feeding.

Dress comfortably. Wear breastfeeding bras and blouses with hidden compartments that allow you to deed your baby in public without having to show anything. Easy access makes breastfeeding easier for your baby, too.

Enjoy yourself. Keep a book, magazine, or the TV remote handy to help you relax and enjoy the time, especially if your baby nods off.

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Dinner’s Ready: When to Feed

On demand. Feed your baby when he is hungry. That is usually every one to three hours in the first few weeks of life. The time between feedings usually lengthens as your baby grows and develops. Try to do a minimum of eight feedings in a twenty-four-hour period.

Good latch. Help your baby latch on to your breast by stroking his cheek with your finger or nipple. This should trigger the rooting reflex, which will help him open his mouth and begin sucking. Wait until your baby’s mouth is open wide before inserting your nipple.

Weight gain. It is difficult to know hoe much milk your baby is getting while breastfeeding, so check his weight from time to time. He will lose some weight after birth, but he should double his birth weight by four month and triple it by one year.

Wet nappies. Another way to confirm that your baby’s getting enough milk is to check to see that he is producing eight to twelve wet nappies a day and substantial stools at least a few times a day.

Nursing feelings. Some mothers become emotional during breastfeeding and may weep or feel depressed. Try some relaxation techniques to help you stay calm, or talk to your doctor if you are having trouble dealing with your emotions.

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Crying: Baby Is Frustrated (and So Are You!)

Babies also cry when they get frustrated or angry. Here are some tips for helping your baby (and you) get through a difficult time.

Act fast. Respond to your baby’s cries quickly and accurately. Learn his different cries as soon as possible, so you can tend to his needs without wasting time. The sooner you respond, the easier it will be to calm him down.

Hold tight. Swaddle your baby, hold him close, and talk to him in a soothing voice.

 

Tips for parents;

Take a break. Put your baby down for a few minutes in a safe place, and do something soothing such as enjoying a cup of tea, doing relaxation techniques, or calling a friend for support. Then pick up your baby again when you feel refreshed

Get help. If you find your self-getting tense and irritable, find someone to take care of your baby for a while. (Make sure anyone who looks after your baby is qualified to care for a young child.) Many cities have crisis hotlines for parents to call when they are at risk of hurting their child.

Caution: never shake your baby in an attempt to calm him down. Shaking a baby can cause brain damage, spinal injuries, and even death. Get help if you are feeling angry and frustrated with your baby.

 

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Crying: Baby Is Sick

Babies cry when they are not feeling well. Common causes include fever, earache, stomachache, or infection. Consider the following symptoms as possible signs of illness, and do not hesitate to call your doctor I you think your baby needs to be seen.

Ear pulling. Your baby is pulling at her ears or rubbing the side of her face.

Relentless crying. Your baby is crying nonstop and won’t be comforted.

Fever. Your baby feels hot to the touch and may have a fever (or you have taken her temperature and confirmed her fever).

Labored breathing. Your baby is having difficulty breathing or is breathing very fast.

Lethargy. Your baby’s energy level is way below normal.

Appearance. Your baby is pale or flushed, or she just looks sick.

 

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Crying: Baby Is Overstimulated

Some babies cry from overstimulation (too much activity or noise) and may have trouble winding down. Here are some tips to help your baby learn to calm himself.

Change the scenery. Move your baby to a quiet room.

Do not disturb. Try to keep your baby on a regular schedule, especially if disruptions upset him.

Do not neglect naps. Give your baby the opportunity to take longer or more frequent naps, but be careful not to let him sleep so much during the day that he is not tired at night.

Take a break. Remove your baby from an overlay stimulating situation, such as a crowd of people, loud noises, or lots of activity.

Soothe your baby. Sing to your baby as you gently sway him back and forth.

 

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Spew Alert: Vomiting

Babies vomit frequently in the first few weeks, mainly because their digestive systems are adjusting to a new feeding process. They are used to being fed through their umbilical cords, and now they have to ingest food through their mouths. Babies also vomit when they are jostled, when they drink too much milk, when they swallow air, or when they drink too fast. They usually vomit up only a teaspoon or so, so do not be alarmed unless your baby is vomiting very forcefully.

Get a head start. Try to feed your baby before she becomes ravenous, so she does not take in too much milk too quickly.

Take a burp break. Burp your baby before starting her on the other breast (or after a few milliliters from a bottle) to help her remove the air she’s swallowed.

Position your baby. Hold your baby upright after a feeding to help prevent vomiting and to aid digestion.

Hold steady. Do not jostle your baby after a feeding.

Check the teat. If you are using a bottle, examine the size of the teat hole and make sure it is not too small or too large.

Weigh in. weigh your baby once a week to see if she is gaining or losing weight. You can use a baby scale or subtract your weight from your combined weight. Talk to your doctor about any concerns.

Check the color. If your baby’s vomit is green, call your doctor.

Give it time. Remember, your baby’s digestive system needs time to adjust. Significant vomiting usually diminishes by six months, if not earlier.

 

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